insects

''Naturam ducem sequentes numquam aberrarimus''

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  1. biomedicalephemera:

The Giant King Cricket (Anostostoma australasiae) 
A member of the same family as the Giant Wetas of New Zealand, the Giant King Cricket is the heaviest cricket in Australia, and is one of the largest in the world. Living in the rainforest environments of Queensland and New South Wales, these Orthoptera emerge only on wet nights, and eat slow-moving insects and rotting fruit.
King Crickets aren’t threatened or endangered, though they’re not exactly easy to find. As burrowers, the only real chance for an inexperienced explorer to find one is under significant piles of leaf detritus. But hey! If you’re ever stranded in the Queensland/NSW rainforest and come across one, they apparently make as good a meal as the New Zealand wetas! They might not taste great uncooked, but they’re not deadly, and aren’t especially skittish critters, at the least.
The Naturalist’s Library: Introduction to Entomology. James Duncan, Edited by William Jardin, 1840.

    biomedicalephemera:

    The Giant King Cricket (Anostostoma australasiae)

    A member of the same family as the Giant Wetas of New Zealand, the Giant King Cricket is the heaviest cricket in Australia, and is one of the largest in the world. Living in the rainforest environments of Queensland and New South Wales, these Orthoptera emerge only on wet nights, and eat slow-moving insects and rotting fruit.

    King Crickets aren’t threatened or endangered, though they’re not exactly easy to find. As burrowers, the only real chance for an inexperienced explorer to find one is under significant piles of leaf detritus. But hey! If you’re ever stranded in the Queensland/NSW rainforest and come across one, they apparently make as good a meal as the New Zealand wetas! They might not taste great uncooked, but they’re not deadly, and aren’t especially skittish critters, at the least.

    The Naturalist’s Library: Introduction to Entomology. James Duncan, Edited by William Jardin, 1840.